Ginza Maison Hermes : Temporary closing on April 2nd.

Le Forum and Le Studio will be closed on April 2nd (Sat), due to the temporary closing of the Ginza store.
Thank you for your understanding.
2016/02/08 19:00
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"INCURSION" Kate MccGwire



[Title] INCURSION
[Artist] Kate MccGwire
[Date] January 21 to March 15, 2016


This year the first window display to celebrate the 2016 theme of ‘Nature at full gallop’ at Maison Hermes is by the British Artist, Kate MccGwire, who extracts the unlimited potential of organic materials. Nature is full of binary beauty; while the surface may be alluring, there is always a darker undercurrent, a primal energy. Nature is unrivaled in its splendor, creativity, efficiency and function, but by harnessing organic materials, MccGwire uses the language of authenticity and turns it into something otherworldly.

Juxtaposed against the setting of a semi-derelict warehouse, we see carefully crafted leather bridles ready to be used for gentleman’s pastime - a serene situation which is disrupted by a seething ominous form that breaks through the corrugated iron background and punctures the aged floorboards. The physical presence of sculpture, the curve, thickness and volume look somehow familiar, its creases and crevices refer to us, our physicality, and yet, looking closer, it seems alien and strange. The pattern of the feathers are reminiscent of water, but also hair, its natural colours and textures make it glow with a sinister energy, the unedited colour of the rooster feathers transforming from one shade to another as you circumvent the piece.

This celebration of natural materials is central to MccGwire’s work, the process of collecting, sorting and embracing the materials is as important as the creation of the final piece. The method starts with sketches and imaginings of the work, but when it comes to fabrication, the unaltered colour and curves of the feathers are essential to the outcome of the final design, with each feather having its own intuitive characteristics. The rooster feathers in INCURSION for instance have numerous tones depending on where and how you see it, with potential colours of green, bronze, pink, blue and black depending on how it catches the light. This gives the piece its shimmering beauty, while the sheer scale and number of feathers takes a familiar object and transforms it into something unexpected.

In the smaller windows we see the rooster feathers used to describe a much smaller forms, alongside a series of works made with pheasant feathers. Male pheasants are very decorative creatures, with several different sizes and patterns of feathers in one bird. As a bird, which is farmed for meat, these feathers would normally be thrown away. But here MccGwire treasures each one, using each type of pheasant feather in isolation the unique design is highlighted, and even on a small scale this creates a striking presence. Even more enticing is the subtle difference in colours when it catches the light. While at first the feathers seem red, orange or brown, there are notes of green and purple – which we will leave passers by to discover.

In MccGwire’s work we are asked to pause and appreciate the beauty and truth of Nature that often passes us by. It reminds us that Nature is there to be treated with respect and reverence, and that we can rediscover ourselves by interacting with its potential.


Kate MccGwire is an internationally renowned British sculptor whose practice probes the beauty inherent in duality, employing natural materials to explore the play of opposites at an aesthetic, intellectual and visceral level. Growing up on the Norfolk Broads her connection with nature and fascination with birds was nurtured from an early age, with avian subjects and materials a recurring theme in her artwork. Since graduating from the Royal College of Art in 2004 her uncanny sculptures have been exhibited at the Saatchi Gallery (London), the Museum of Art and Design (New York), the Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature (Paris) and most recently at the Venice Biennale as part of Glasstress 2015. (www.katemccgwire.com)

2016/01/25 19:00
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2016/01/22 17:00
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L’odeur de la papaye verte


©1993 LES PRODUCTION LAZENNEC

La nature au galop / Dans la maison

L'odeur de la papaye verte (The Scent of Green Papaya)


1993 / France, Vietnam / 104min / Color / Blu-ray

Producer: Christophe Rossignon
Director / Writer: Tran Anh Hung
Cinematography: Benoît Delhomme
Music: Tôn Thât Tiêt
Production Designer: Alain Negre
Cast:Nu Yen Khe Tran, Man San Lu, Thi Loc Truong, Anh-Hoa Nguyen, Hoa Hoi Vuong,
Subtitle: Yukiko Furuta

Saigon, Vietnam, 1951. Mùi, a 10-year-old girl, is hired as a servant in a wealthy home and serves the family with dedication. One day Mùi meets Khuyen, a friend of the family’s eldest son, and develops a case of puppy love. Ten years later, she has grown into a beautiful young woman, and she goes to work as a servant in the home of Khuyen, who is now a musician. Mùi’s selfless devotion gradually brings about a sea change in Khuyen’s emotions…….

The moist earth after a rain, the trees wet with dew, the hubbub of the street and the blinding sunshine. The scenes of the leafy streets of old Saigon were actually filmed entirely on a soundstage in Boulogne, France. The film is the directorial debut of Tran Anh Hung, a Frenchman of Vietnamese ancestry, and won the Golden Camera Award (for best new director) at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival and the César Award for best new work in 1994.


※Reservation starts on February 13
To make reservation, please vist the reservation site;
http://reservation.maisonhermes.jp/artit/
2016/01/18 16:00
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2016/01/18 12:00
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2015/12/28 11:00
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Le Studio will be starting from March 5th.
We hope to receive your continued patronage.
Details will be updated soon.
2015/12/28 10:00
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Upcoming Exhibition Announcement: YÔKAÏNOSHIMA by Charle...



Exhibition Period: 19th February (Friday), - 15th May (Sunday), 2016
            Mon-Sat 11:00-20:00 (Last entry 19:30),
            Sun 11:00-19:00 (Last entry 18:30)
            Open daily (Except for April 2nd)
            Free admission
Venue:         Ginza Maison Hermès Le Forum
            (8F, 5-4-1 Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan 
            TEL: 03-3569-3300)
Organized by:     Fondation d’entreprise Hermès
Supported by:     MEM
Under the auspices of: Embassy of France/Institut français du Japon


Charles Fréger is a French photographer known for series of photographs of costumes taken in various locations around the world––ethnic and traditional costumes and outfits worn for local practices, rituals, festivals and other special occasions. He travels to each country in person and captures portraits of the astoundingly wide range of human beings and their activities, which are fascinating from an anthropological and ethnological as well as an artistic standpoint.

For the EMPIRE series shot in 2004-2007, he took photographs of hussars (ceremonial cavalrymen) who appear in ritualistic roles in 16 different countries, including some kingdoms and republics, primarily in Europe. Their extraordinarily ornate and solemn yet highly idiosyncratic uniforms speak to us about the national and collective rules, roles, and even politics and power structures of their communities.

In his recent, celebrated WILDER MANN series (2010-2011), Fréger portrayed the figures of beastly “wild men” who appear in traditional festivals and rituals in various parts of Europe. The bizarre, frightening and yet humorous wild men, dressed as bears, goats, devils, or anthropomorphic characters, resurrect primitive narratives that evolved out of exchanges and a symbiosis between humankind and the forces of nature. It was because of the intriguing commonalities between these ancient winter festivals, which survive in every corner of Europe, and the Japanese culture of toshigami (New Year’s deities), that Fréger visited Japan to further develop the series.

Traveling from north to south, Fréger shot photos in 58 locations throughout the Japanese islands, and titled the series YÔKAÏNOSHIMA. The photos feature the unique masked deities and demons of Japan emerging from the nation’s fields, mountains, forests, and seacoasts. While yokai are Japanese folkloric figures that embody fear and awe, they allow us to rediscover a familiar presence lurking beneath the surface of everyday life since time out of mind, and can be also seen in relation to the animated and branded characters so ubiquitous in pop culture today.

The scenography for this exhibition is created by the young up-and-coming architect Jumpei Matsushima. The structure, inspired by the distinctive island landscape of Japan, encompasses approximately 100 works by Charles Fréger, with the new YÔKAÏNOSHIMA as a centerpiece and also including the WILDER MANN photos.
2015/12/24 16:00
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Le Studio : Next year's program.

Next year's Le Studio will be starting from March 5th.
We hope to receive your continued patronage.
2015/11/24 15:00
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"Like Buildings, Like Living Creatures" onishimaki + hya...



[Title] Like Buildings, Like Living Creatures
[Artist] onishimaki + hyakudayuki architects / o+h
[Date] November 18, 2015 to January 19, 2016


The flâneur of Paris drew deep inspiration from the details they encountered on their leisurely strolls about the city, prompting them to transform those images into poetry, photography, literature and other forms of art. From the proverbial bird’s-eye view, the distinctive characteristics of the myriad architecture filling the storied French capital may very much be said to have fueled the muses of these wanderers.

It is the shared belief of Maki Onishi and Yuki Hyakuda, the two young architects behind the office undertaking this latest window display, that structures teeming with unique personality traits remain deeply entrenched in people’s minds and memories. In France, one major example of this pattern is the Unité d’Habitation, a massive apartment house designed for the city of Marseille by the late celebrated French architect Le Corbusier. To Onishi and Hyakuda, rather than a building as such, this structure is viewed more closely in terms of a presence imbued with vitality – much like the image of a voluptuous woman ready to take off running at any given moment.

We normally perceive buildings as fixed structures certain never to budge. Yet, if we forget our preconceptions and let our imagination run wild for a minute, we can consider architecture as living creatures that roam about in cities, which leads to unthinkable visions. Buildings, for example, out roaming city streets in the dead of night. Soft and fluffy roofs, buoyant like clouds in the skies overhead. In Japan, portable shrines paraded around the streets of traditional downtown quarters during festivals are, by their very definition, abodes of the deities. In this formula, having such homes move about the streets is far than enough to spawn an intriguing sense of jovial celebration throughout entire neighborhood realms.

This latest Maison Hermès Window display overflows with such inspired and free-roaming power. Objects portrayed in the image of buildings, while also appearing like living creatures of this or that species. Shapes cut in the likeness of a landscape cascading over a woman’s shoulders emerge as heartwarming roofs encompassing spatial domains where children can frolic. There must certainly be small structures lurking in all corners of the district, poised to meander aimlessly between the tall buildings of Ginza after dark, in totally free and unfettered fashion. Isn’t it about time for all of us to set out on leisurely rambles of our own about town, in the hunt for calibers of architectural delights brimming with vitality and life?


onishimaki + hyakudayuki architects / o+h
An architectural office launched in 2008 by Maki Onishi (born in 1983) and Yuki Hyakuda (1982). This young architect duo has captured major attention for the “Sengataki Villa” (recipient of the SD Review magazine 2007 Kashima Prize), “Double Helix House” (Shinkenchiku Award of 2012), the Prize for Excellence in having their design proposal selected for used in the project to build the Fukuchi Town Municipal Library and Historical Archive (Fukuoka Prefecture) in 2015 and other prestigious honors. This Maison Hermès Window display was coordinated by o+h Chief Designer Shiho Eika. Among the office’s published writings are Collected Architectural Works of onishimaki + hyakudayuki architects / o+h (published by Garden City Publishers of Taiwan in 2012), 8 Stories (LIXIL Publishing, 2014) and other works.
2015/11/21 11:00
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