no image

HO TZU NYEN: PT III

“Without doubt, many art institutions will harbor the fantasy of catching up to the instant—for example, by making ‘instagrammable’ shows—but for me, a possible redemption of the museum today is its very slowness. It can offer a break in the ‘rhetoric of immediacy’ demanded by the accelerated circuit of social media.”

no image

HO TZU NYEN: PT II

“That faction of the Kyoto School took significant risks with their careers and lives to do and say what they thought to be right. And we might also acknowledge that they sought to do this in a largely uncynical way, in the thickness of their historical moment, without the benefit of hindsight. Reading about them makes me wonder if I would have been able to do any better in a similar situation.”

no image

HO TZU NYEN: PT I

LEAP BEYOND VOID—By Andrew Maerkle
“How does Buddhism get wrapped up in the techniques of violence and killing of samurai culture, which in many ways culminated in kamikaze culture? This led me to a kind of inconsistency at the root of Kyoto School philosophy. For example, Kitaro Nishida’s foundational concept of zettai mu, or “absolute nothingness”: it is absolute but nothing at the same time.”

no image

ROSA BARBA: PT III

“For me the volcano has always represented a central metaphor for the complex relationships between society and politics in Italy. At the foot of the sleeping monster the mafia runs its empire. Meanwhile, all official attention is focused on the volcano, where nature is dramatized as a media spectacle—a powerful structure beyond comprehension.”

no image

ROSA BARBA: PT II

“I try to create an anarchic organization of cinematic space in my films and larger exhibitions. Anarchic organization attempts to build a foundation for thinking and acting by destabilizing the old hierarchies of film’s components. It gives viewers more freedom about where to look, what to read first, how to bring all of these narratives together, and, indeed, how to edit the space.”

no image

ROSA BARBA: PT I

DOUBLE WHISTLER — By Andrew Maerkle
“In recent years I’ve been struck by the affinities between astronomy and cinema. On one level, both engage with concepts of light, time, and distance. Indeed, it could be argued that both astronomy and cinema are essentially composed of only these elements. On yet another level, both can be understood as sharing, in different ways, fundamental aspects of uncertainty and speculation.”

no image

HO RUI AN: PT III

“In Thailand, the word IMF entered popular usage during the Asian financial crisis and became a synonym for ‘cheap.’ I think the foreign origin of the word, or what Vicente Rafael calls the ‘promise of the foreign,’ is what opens the word itself to becoming a carrier for new meanings.”

no image

HO RUI AN: PT II

“In Japan, there was the benshi narrator. In Thailand, there were the versionists who would travel in troupes in the provinces, where they would present films accompanied by a live aural performance that served to supplement the projected image in various ways, from narration to dubbing, commentary or even critique. You can read this practice as an extreme localization of the foreign or generic.”

no image

HO RUI AN: PT I

IMAGE CRISIS — By Andrew Maerkle
“I think it would be too ambitious to say that the lectures in themselves offer an escape from capitalism, because that’s obviously not what’s happening. The starting point can be just a single question that I’m trying to answer. For Asia the Unmiraculous, this is the question of the relationship between race and capitalism.”

no image

MINOUK LIM

Music is not immaterial, but it is molecularized based on territory, as with bird calls. It makes boundaries and is in turn made by the boundaries, which I see as a kind of self-collapse. This point of self-collapse is what interests me: where one needs the other but cannot be differentiated from the other at the same time.

Copyrighted Image