adrian's blog

Reviews and reflections on the Japanese contemporary art world

Horses



Just in time for the Chinese New Year, a few thoughts on the year that has ended. I picked up the ArtAsiaPacific almanac today in the West Village. MAM curator Kenichi Kondo does a very thorough job in his summary of the year for Japan, also modestly not overplaying Mori Art Museum's various contributions to the year, which included an interesting but patchy Roppongi Crossing. Here, the obvious but vaguely defined theme of rethinking Japanese society in the cold light of the post 2011 disasters was one more instance of how this particular framing has become all dominant, the only current narrative of Japanese creativity at a time when the politics of the nation get gloomier and gloomier.

Partly, of course, there have been creative opportunities in the wake of the disaster: a real chance for artists and architects to show their meaning and significance for society. I would be the first person to endorse with relief the fact that everyone has now moved on from the period of vacuous pop art heralded by the era of "Cool Japan". On the other hand, concerned and engaged art does not necessarily make for good art, and a lot of what we have seen in the post March 2011 period has been weak and superficial.

In contrast, I hope to have showcased a few of the more important contributions this past year. It started exceedingly well: with brilliant shows by Lieko Shiga "Rasen Kaigan" at Sendai, and "Takamine Tadasu's Cool Japan" at Mito, both of which I wrote about.

Lieko Shiga: http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hlIApXvyYV9tP8Oi7Efu/

Takamine Tadasu: http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/KBipvdVRgYQwFJWea3xA/

Tadashi Kawamata transformed BankArt; I was thrilled to be able to do a sprawling two hour hour interview with him later in the year at the site of his "Collective Folie" tower of babel in Paris at the Villette. He was philosophical about what was surely the funniest (i.e., most ridiculous) event in the global art world this year: the "riot" and police brutality at his "favela" café at last year's Art Basel (google "favela art riot").


COLLECTIVE FOLIE

I also caught up with Shimabuku, and a delightful retrospective put on Jonathan Watkins at Birmingham's IKON gallery during the summer.

Shimabuku: http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/byOAZx47dwjhrzSLDfMX/

It has been a very good year for Shinro Ohtake and Koki Tanaka, who both featured at Venice, and found heavy attention back home. Ohtake finally seems to be getting some deserved international attention, which will hopefully help re-establish some of the true origins of Neo-Pop in Japan. Congratulations to two other artists I have focused on in my blog, Aiko Miyanaga and Tatzu Nishi, as well deserved winners at the first Nissan Art Prize. I certainly missed one great show everybody was talking about: Tomoko Yoneda's retrospective at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography. Then there was the moving and quite brilliant posthumous tribute by Noi Sawaragi to the very sadly missed Takashi Azumaya at ArataniUrano and Yamamoto Gendai. Azumaya was the first true independent curator in Japan; a rare and fragile breed, who always struggle outside the conservatism of the mainstream museum system.

In New York, and therefore globally, it was a good year for the modern and contemporary Japanese Art Historians, with big shows at MoMA and the Guggenheim elevating the 1950s and 60s avant gardes to a more prominent place in the world pantheon. Also good to see Ushio Shinohara getting a lot of attention, with an exhibition and the film documentary with his wife, Noriko, Cutie and the Boxer. Genpei Akasagawa was also everywhere: I was very happy to co-host a book presentation by UCLA's William Marotti in Paris in December, about his recently published book on the 1960s, Money, Trains and Guillotines: Art and Revolution in 1960s Japan.

In the autumn, I was able to return to Japan for the end of triennale season. Aichi Triennale exceeded expectations, with a strong, politicised show. It was good to get the inside stories from curator Tetsuya Ozaki, particularly about the extraordinary anti-nuclear performances by jazz superstar Otomo Yoshihide. I missed Setouchi, because of other priorities in an insanely busy week. Top of my list was the amazing Kodai Nakahara retrospective in Okayama (surely the exhibition of the year -- its the one that Kondo unfortunately misses in his round up). I also met there with local heroine Erina Matsui and curators from Ohara Museum, as well as getting down to Beppu to interview Takashi Serizawa, the pioneering environmental curator, about the Beppu Art Project. As always it was a joy and privilege to pass by Fukuoka to talk with Raiji Kuroda at FAAM, and Kyoto to visit Mizuki Endo, check out his burgeoining HAPS organisation and talk about his hopes and fears for Japan today, reflected in Care of the Self, his amazing "poetical diary" of a dangerous solo walk he made along the coastline of Tohoku to the Fukushima exclusion zone. And I ended up on another island, Momoshima, with a chance to spend time with artist/curator Taro Furukata and explore his collaborative venture with Yukinori Yanagi.

The exhibition "100 Ideas on Tomorrow's Island -- What Art Can Do For A Better Society" turned the whole island of rotting orange trees, rusting mini-vans and empty shacks into a breathtaking gesamtkunstwerk. Yanagi's Art Base on Momoshima in the Seto sea is one of the most interesting and deep thinking utopian projects currently dealing with Japan's eery post-growth, post-industrial, post-disaster condition, and on this island of crows, cats and spiders (and about 500 old people), he is developing a long term transformative vision of this wasted landscape and how and why artists might decide to live there.

Yukinori Yanagi: http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0gnkJL2e6ujiKosCrFqv/

It was all a million miles away from hyper-commercial Tokyo, and the autumn announcement that the Olympics will be coming there in 2020. I know everyone cringes at the thought of a plastic coated nationalist branded Olympics using cosplay characters, maid cafés and smily cartoons to hide the ongoing reality of Fukushima, Tohoku and a thousand other genkai shuuraku wasting away in the shadow of the all devouring metropolis. But we better get used to this serially uncool idea, whether or not they recruit some famous artists to provide the imagery.

Tokyo Olympics: http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SIJlEaqomuX3ZFsQpA9y/

All my ART-iT blogs from 2009-2013, an A-Z of the Japanese art world, including featured artists, curators, writers, gallerists and collectors can be accessed through the following link. Check it! You might be in there.

ART-iT Index: http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4sSyJd5MBKF3c8E2iGXP/

Horses. It is meant to be a lucky year. Let us hope so.



ADRIAN FAVELL
http://www.adrianfavell.com
2014/01/26 11:24
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Yukinori Yanagi


SUBMARINE (sculpture), 2013

I recently published a review of Yukinori Yanagi's New Works about his extraordinary Art Base Momoshima project online in Art Forum:

http://artforum.com/archive/id=44224

As usual here I publish the text along with a few additional images from the island, as well as the show, courtesy of Miyake Fine Art, Tokyo

Yukinori Yanagi, New Works
Miyake Fine Art
Tokyo, 26 Oct - 21 Dec

Japanese "neo-Pop" pioneer Yukinori Yanagi has had relatively low international visibility in recent years. After returning definitively to Japan from New York in 2000, his work took on an altogether different scale, both temporally and spatially, involving the artistic transformation of industrially despoiled, semi-abandoned volcanic islands in Japan's inland sea. The pieces in this exhibition are windows to a vastly ambitious new endeavour: the Art Base Momoshima project, commenced in November 2012 in a former junior high school on a small island near Hiroshima.


ART BASE IN OLD SCHOOL


YANAGI'S JEEP


ART BASE FLAG BY RAUL WALCH


YANAGI'S MANIFESTO

Using oil, graphite, and emulsion on twenty-one photographic prints of views looking out to sea, Yanagi sketches pieces of ships floating on barges; a surreal still life of the region's decaying industrial base.


MOMOSHIMA PROJECT NO.10 (collage, graphite and emulsion on paper), 32x50cm

These works are accompanied by a small rough-hewn sculpture Submarine, 2013, made from pieces of metal found on the island; and images of the battered 1950s movie theater in the village, re-imagined as a temple of failed modernity. Pictured on stage, a projection of Yanagi's signature neon hinomaru (Japanese flag) articulates his critique of crumbling nationalism, alongside a wry nostalgia for the post-war boom years.


MOMOSHIMA TOEI RECONSTRUCT PROJECT NO.2 (collage, oil paint, graphite, colored pencil and emulsion on paper), 50x65cm

Momoshima was once a thriving community based on orange farming, teeming with family life.


THE OLD TOEI CINEMA

It is now a certifiable genkai shūraku, a settlement doomed to die out. Today the population is around 550 and falling, 70 percent of the residents are over sixty years old, and desperately few children are living on the island.


HEAD COUNT OF POPULATION IN VILLAGE HALL

From the survivalist-style Art Base, Yanagi and a few young associates are plotting a temporary revitalization of the island, nursing it towards an inevitable future through a kind of slow art. A recent group show curated by the Berlin-based artist Taro Furukata (“100 Ideas on Tomorrow’s Island – What Art Can Do for a Better Society”), inspired German and Japanese artists in residency to clear several abandoned homes and convert them into repositories of memory and change.

See the website:
http://artbasemomoshima.jp/exhibition_e/index.html


MINKA HOUSE CONTENTS WRAPPED UP BY JUN MASUDA


HOUSE ART CONVERSION BY MOUHITORI

The resultant trail of discovery transformed the whole village into an eerie gesamtkunstwerk.


COKE IS IT


SHARP WAS IT

Amid empty shacks, rusting Toyotas, and villagers outnumbered by crows, cats, and spiders, the Momoshima project quietly explores post-industrial collapse and social decline—a possible future for any society in which development is based only on illusions of endless economic growth.


CROWS ON A WIRE


END OF THE BUBBLE YEARS

ADRIAN FAVELL
http://www.adrianfavell.com
2013/12/09 02:00
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Theory of Tempelhof



Utopian thinking from a single case study

On the walls of Berlin’s U-Bahn stations, there is a large city map. Amidst the expanse of grey matter that makes up the sprawl of the city, to the south of the centre, there is a huge green hole: the former Tempelhof airport. Thinking of this as a brain scan, with the city as a self-organising process as theories of emergence suggest, Tempelhof looks like an anomaly, or malignant growth. 400 hectares of wasted urban space; a mortal threat to the functional city.

The fascists developed the airport as a statement of power and modernity; it was in its time the biggest hub of mobility in Europe. The long curved main building, with its spectacular cantilevered roof and oversized yellow stone facades, was the longest building in the world. It then stood for liberty during the Berlin airlift of the 1950s, and until 2008 airline passengers could thrill at landing in the middle of this battered city and watching people cooking or making out through the apartment windows as the planes landed.

Now, it is an airport no more; a dead airport, with what’s left of its luggage belts, EU entry signage, and fleets of airplanes -- one vintage Vokker out on the tarmac -- all strictly simulations. The land encompassing the two runways and service roads is a huge empty park, mostly concreted, grown over with grass and a few trees. In 2010, Berliners took back the space. Now they come here to play; to walk their dogs, race on roller skates, kiss and hold hands, or imagine the future of post-growth cities, while scanning the urban horizon; to do whatever they want, with no presuppositions, on land that is -- or could be -- close to zero developmental value.

Before the city and developers really move back in, there is a utopian moment; a quixotic investment of people in this massive pure urban space. Unfillable halls and hangers for open activity; in which the culture and the content is irrelevant. Things that can be done, which have and make no value, in a space in which almost whatever you do can have no impact upon it -- it is already so ruined with tarmac, rubble and industrial waste -- and where it is almost impossible to imagine any activity or construction that would be big enough to fill even a tiny part of it. It is utopian space, purposeless. Use-less. Devoid of material value. They gave it a name: Tempelhofer Freiheit. The last free urban space in Europe.

A dead airport in a dead city; or, rather, an anti-airport in an anti-city, because the people are still here, playing, after the functional city has disappeared. The architecture lost its function and freed its form, as the ruins of the future. We can now imagine this airport space, this anomalous growth at the heart of a new anti-Berlin. Circling the perimeter of the park, we can imagine how many of these other buildings we see on the horizon -- factories, carparks, shopping malls, gas stations, schools, universities, government buildings -- may no longer function as they did; they too could be ruins, with the people in them playing not working; the cars on the freeway are going nowhere, and small gecekondu (overnight buildings) built of wooden, tarpaulins and founds objects, grow up on the grass in the spaces and shade of older concrete and glass constructions... One by one the architecture of the functional city is disappearing as the urban economy slides slowly into decline, moving towards a steady state entropy in which everyone is able to live and play, but the functions of the old, growth-driven, developing city atrophy and wither away. The anti-city in which everyone is now an architect ...

Why here? Why Berlin? It is important to think about the rationale of the single, selective case. We scan the world and its cities for single examples and selective vignettes that might show us the way in urban theory. Berlin, for example, is the key to understanding why Japan -- and its 100% paved over urbanism in decline -- is the closest thing we have to the future. The world and its cities present us with near infinite diversity of forms -- no single models. Only the hazard of specific conditions and conjunctions of history, geography and place could have produced this anomalous hole in the middle of the city. Through the hole we see the future; before the developers move in again.

The utopian visison of Tempelhof, of course, is just that; the real plans for the space include some apartments and a public civic facility (a public library), which will redefine the space in a way at once humdrum and controlled. What they will build will be like Potsdamerplatz is now: an ersatz Berlin, albeit smoothly functional. No doubt someone will think it a good idea to give Starbucks a franchise. Re-development will seek to absorb Tempelhof whole back into the functional city. Dissolve the abnormal growth. But such a plan may literally be bankrupt; this kind of medicine never wins the battle, it only holds off the inevitable for a while. The only parts of Berlin which feel real now are the unfinished building sites -- shabby advertising hordings, mounds of broken concrete, and weeds growing through the cracks -- where the city is still becoming; the finished developments feel void, a generic global city that is Berlin no more.

The challenge of post-growth is to see negative development as qualitative progress. Deflation of value towards zero as productive. Societal output as tending towards stasis (what is often called entropy). Culture as nothing but empty, random content and play. We are left with the empty relics of a former civilisation: as anomalous and pointless as an ornamental graveyard, chateaux of the dead, rising up like some absurd gothic playground. Let us start our walk together here...

With thanks to Marta Rodríguez, architect -- and Julian Worrall, for ongoing conversations.

ADRIAN FAVELL
http://www.adrianfavell.com
2013/09/25 21:28
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Tokyo Olympics



So former Tokyo Governor Mr Ishihara's dream has come true, and Tokyo will have the Olympics in 2020. Congratulations, all round, I suppose. As a student of culture in the city politics, I have been watching the contest to hold these Olympics with great attention for some time. Basically, Tokyo -- which has been a no-hoper also-ran in two previous competitions -- got extremely lucky this time. A miracle happened, and despite having the weakest of the three bids, the event fell into its lap. It would have surely gone to Istanbul had Mr Erdogan -- a pugnacious "grande gueule" conservative capitalist politician in a similar mould to Ishihara -- not turned the police loose on the street protesters in May, destroying any further hopes of Turkey's liberalisation and integration into world politics. Madrid meanwhile was simply bankrupt, in the midst of Spain's worst recession in decades. With Tokyo still shaking from the effects of the 2011 disasters, and Fukushima still pumping unknown amounts of radiation into the atmosphere, the Olympics committee must have been wondering why on Earth they had narrowed the field to these three problematic contenders. But after Turkey screwed up, it had to go Japan. They closed their eyes and voted overwhelmingly in its favour.

The decision is surely good news for the Tokyo art world. Despite its conservatism, there have been positive examples of support from the city government for art over the last few years. For all its problems, Tokyo Wonder Site has been an important and central venue for many initiatives. There will be many spin offs and opportunities, as well as an obvious injection of funding, that will bring many benefits to artists in Tokyo. Perhaps the world will start paying attention again to Japanese contemporary art.

I fear the worst in terms of branding: an Otaku Olympics. The use of embarrassing "Cool Japan" branding ideas during the campaign has continued, and there will be a temptation to turn the whole event into a ridiculous Japanese cartoon, no doubt full of smily flowers and cute girls in cosplay. Somebody needs to tell the nerdy conservative politicians in suits that this stuff is not cool.

Even more sinister, the Olympics will be a big excuse for a whole new round of global capital real estate and corporate development. Expect Ishihara to finally realise those plans for sweeping away some of the parts of Old Tokyo that have not yet been bulldozed in the name of tourist and capital redevelopment (including the famous Tsukiji fish market: http://goo.gl/KNLs1v). The Sky Tree -- that huge upside down electric blue space age baseball bat shoved up into some of the poorest neighborhoods of North East Tokyo -- is the portent for the kind of insensitive urbanist boom time that is sure to come. I expect many of my favourite parts of Tokyo will be disappearing in the next few years.

Despite its roster of extraordinary world class architects, Japanese architecture has been snubbed in the Olympics plans, and the stadium has been given to Zaha Hadid. Tokyo will just get another one of her generic cliché global city monuments that you can see anywhere and everywhere. I find this selection kind of pathetic given the opportunity to have done something important for Japanese architecture.

Finally, is the Olympics good for Japan? Or just good for Tokyo? I suspect there will be very little benefit for cities and regions around the country, already suffering from the massive over-concentration of elite urbanisation in the capital city, and its winner-take-all drive. The spectacular social polarisation of city centre and rural periphery will continue, and continue to get worse in the next few years. There may however be the added drama of a few athletes expiring live in the heat of the competition. Given that the event is taken place in the middle of July, and in the last two years Tokyo has been seeing rising (and possibly radioactive?) temperatures of 40 degrees plus, the only sensible thing would have been to locate the event in Akita or Aomori.

ADRIAN FAVELL
http://www.adrianfavell.com
2013/09/22 19:36
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Shimabuku



I have just published with Art Forum a review of the excellent current retrospective of Shimabuku at Birmingham Ikon Gallery, curated by Jonathan Watkins. Please enjoy!

The online review can be found here:

http://artforum.com/index.php?pn=picks&id=42603&view=print

Here is the text:

Berlin-based global rover Shimabuku has long been recognized in his native Japan as a pioneer of social and relational art. This first extensive international retrospective offers a satisfying overview of his gently humorous musings on everyday life and community, usually in the form of videos, installations and photographic narratives about the places he visits and people he meets. Birmingham's neo-gothic late-Victorian Ikon Gallery—a kind of kunsthalle in a former school—offers an elegant backdrop, its variable spaces allowing for an appropriately roomy show, which puts a special emphasis on narrative works made over the years in the UK.

Cucumber Journey (2000) was just that, the story of a leisurely canal journey from London to Birmingham in which the artist learned how to make "slow food": in this case, cucumber pickles, given to friends on arrival. In Swansea Jack (2003), the artist invented and organised a memorial competition in which dogs retrieved objects from the sea in memory of a heroic black retriever who saved many people from drowning. In Fish and Chips (2006), a dreamy underwater video with music documented the blind date of a potato suspended on a fishing line "meeting" live fish in the River Mersey. And, in the one original work conceived for this show, a small catalogue was made available on the streets of the city, but only as a free supplement to The Big Issue, a magazine sold by homeless and unemployed vendors.

The ideas can be hit and miss, and the works collectively demand a suspension of sophisticated critical habits. Nowhere is irony intended; Shimabuku seeks a pure kind of artistic wonder, devoid of the edge so often sought in social art. Ikon director Jonathan Watkins has a long track record in selecting important Japanese contemporary artists who confound our expectations about the country’s popular culture or high-tech futurism; in Shimabuku he has found the perfect ambassador.

An index to all my blog writings for ART-iT can be found here:

http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4sSyJd5MBKF3c8E2iGXP/

ADRIAN FAVELL
http://www.adrianfavell.com

2013/08/23 18:20
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Index of Blogs



With the upcoming change of format at ART-iT and the ending of the "Official Bloggers" part of the site, it is the end of an era for me. I have been publishing essays here since early July 2009: four years and 140 blogs in total that amount to a kind of archive or encyclopaedia of Japanese contemporary art of this period (2009-2013). It is the place where I have tried out all my first thoughts and drafts for my book BEFORE AND AFTER SUPERFLAT, and grappled with all the mysteries, joys and absurdities of the Japanese contemporary artworld.

It has been fun, and I am sure I will continue to blog in some form or another. Below in alphabetical order is a list of artists discussed in some detail (with weblinks) followed by a list of curators, writers, gallerists and collectors. Of course, in my sociological artworld, curators, writers, gallerists and collectors are every bit as important as the artists.

Blogs with basic translations in Japanese are marked (jp). These should always be read carefully in conjunction with the English originals ;)

While every effort has been made to check and update these blogs, I am grateful for any necessary corrections or suggestions to improve them.

Special features on artists or artworld personalities are marked below with **

Please enjoy.


Artists

Aida Makoto
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/2hUn7BNpGikugJfd1SWe/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/iSt4DGaQ1C9xv5rgpHuB/ (jp) **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zM7XWvbDikKEAQ38yI1t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/tOECh2HAmISpqMWBjeVb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/cAyjStvrMHK3uOk2eD9P/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Nkzn2v6rRlWAZLImcqHT/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/fscdwlYh9JPtQX7xC2or/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/AGuYBOno0K8hZbyvNimg/ **

Aikawa Masaru
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9DLfkMYmbVp7ri3TUjev/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/OC4BxUguP1DZ5aQeTW0K/

Ai Weiwei
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/E5DsegQzMAUCWF6HZd13/ **

Ao Shusuke
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/OC4BxUguP1DZ5aQeTW0K/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/mBqdPN7oChMlZXxsLbuR/

Aoyama Satoru
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/EADi80n47hM6flK9psUF/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SUK0P9lIveXo3Acr6iN8/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/arYjPos5S6mpvB2zO10V/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/o4eAXnK6bkidPD2Sj0R7/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0NukOMi9jWBVv8pXLKRe/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pJc4MY9ETAbwmvsd5Unl/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/fscdwlYh9JPtQX7xC2or/

Araki Nobuyoshi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/okPc2Wbryqzea3i9MTRU/

Arima Sumihisa
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zM7XWvbDikKEAQ38yI1t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/tOECh2HAmISpqMWBjeVb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/cAyjStvrMHK3uOk2eD9P/

Asai Yusuke
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/y170WmDhCfzuZYpU9Sgj/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Atelier Bow Wow
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TEWFw2HMUSun3tgGxzqf/

Bellars Peter
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/fscdwlYh9JPtQX7xC2or/

Berlin artists
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Px7hXIFqLdCTWuMNmc6w/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/

Beuys Joseph
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zM7XWvbDikKEAQ38yI1t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/tOECh2HAmISpqMWBjeVb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VkK2Co3J9wrUH1iOBGZb/

Chaos Lounge
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/ **

Chim ↑ Pom
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/2hUn7BNpGikugJfd1SWe/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/O3lracuhLK1WeDX2nSqR/ (jp)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Px7hXIFqLdCTWuMNmc6w/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pJc4MY9ETAbwmvsd5Unl/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/3H0v9ZNKRbCASgdUPcYo/ **

China Mania
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/fo2M9dHR6NGB7S1uYvPw/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/yqS24fFgmcJiL1osVYPx/ (jp)

Dumb Type
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TRmvCasde71G36QALxfi/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/oApmQUe2JW6uVfziHh4C/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/5j8AlLiv3QfbzBIKyTWk/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/O3lracuhLK1WeDX2nSqR/ (jp)

Eguchi Satoru
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Endo Ichiro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0NukOMi9jWBVv8pXLKRe/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/

Gekidan * Shiki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Gokita Tomoo
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/baYH1nLyKtjmZJMzIuSv/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9DLfkMYmbVp7ri3TUjev/

Groovision
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0RYXenHQrL3gEvqsId6p/

Gutai
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SZXzyTkvbwuhim0POxd3/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/DkMQ3fJmN2xsbeirIyLw/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/lfBmUGpzWZ6ADCTNOxQ0/

Hanayo
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Hashimoto Yuki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9DLfkMYmbVp7ri3TUjev/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/OC4BxUguP1DZ5aQeTW0K/

Hayashi Toru
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZFIXjS6wp9AcRyKY5meM/

Higashionna Yuichi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/yFY5cgw0PidVjtebM6XL/

Higashiyama Kaii
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/AGuYBOno0K8hZbyvNimg/

Hiyama Takao
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/mBqdPN7oChMlZXxsLbuR/

Ikeda Masanori
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wafCKmEAh4FLlRp3gDZQ/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VkK2Co3J9wrUH1iOBGZb/

Ikeda Mitsuhiro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Ikeda Ryoji
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/5dpOSCMWDJKyVjYZH8UN/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/

Ikeda Takeshi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Ishibashi Yoshimasa
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wgHbNkzEIOL8jDSJoqpu/

Isozaki Arata
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/KBipvdVRgYQwFJWea3xA/

Itadani Ryu
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0S7x2mX4MCaDhpjHeJqL/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Sr3tVFQAMz058kxsIZR1/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Ito Gabin
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/rf1sUdiA60aVLWRvjcZM/

Ito Toyo
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hlIApXvyYV9tP8Oi7Efu/ **

Izumi Taro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/jNHQroK0AqwIgf2uRD3t/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wgHbNkzEIOL8jDSJoqpu/

Jikken Kobo
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/5yZkRp3FIQ218ah0GW4d/ **

Kaikai Kiki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/eWaA3torkdOCGgEpnK9s/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/

Kaneuji Teppei
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hn3RmoblfFsPIiza6d4X/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/W16gGvEICyfs3cFLPa7l/

Kano Tetsuro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Kasahara Izuru
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Kawamata Tadashi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/7zSKAw6HEmoMJBQfrNaP/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Px7hXIFqLdCTWuMNmc6w/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TEWFw2HMUSun3tgGxzqf/

Kawao Tomoko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Px7hXIFqLdCTWuMNmc6w/

Kinoshita Parco
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zM7XWvbDikKEAQ38yI1t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/tOECh2HAmISpqMWBjeVb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VkK2Co3J9wrUH1iOBGZb/

Kitano (Beat) Takeshi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9yIl4rkiFfN3Rh7PJEgd/

Kito Kengo
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pGIqSw0D89Auta1bNPfQ/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Px7hXIFqLdCTWuMNmc6w/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZFIXjS6wp9AcRyKY5meM/

Kofuneko Tomoko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Px7hXIFqLdCTWuMNmc6w/ **

Koganazawa Takehito
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SRLDEKjW4upbzwdvq8GC/

Koizumi Meiro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/

Kojima Sako
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZFIXjS6wp9AcRyKY5meM/

Kojin Haruka
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Kondoh Akino
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pJc4MY9ETAbwmvsd5Unl/

Koons Jeff
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/rC1VGizqtxbSPoFRsfJ4/

Korean artists
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/c2xmzZyj98Aoe034WlRb/

Kurashige Jin
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wgHbNkzEIOL8jDSJoqpu/

Kusama Yayoi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ihgLvPUZQz8wnMpBdSxj/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wFXg72NbihOWu9ZB1rzR/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/REySKn3rX7FIZ6qgtzhc/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/V4rOKWPydFlL7B0MzxTb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Siwp0OxF7XWu85mJydKQ/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/ **

London artists
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/rgXubHONJ6nMofwFmj4B/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/o4eAXnK6bkidPD2Sj0R7/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SRLDEKjW4upbzwdvq8GC/

Los Angeles artists
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/W16gGvEICyfs3cFLPa7l/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/iTfCLGH4c3SmZgD5ARWP/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/baYH1nLyKtjmZJMzIuSv/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TjKIsrLvniZ5pCNbw9EY/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9DLfkMYmbVp7ri3TUjev/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zMnqaA0XIdfS8NHW5v2x/

Machida Kumi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/sbknoIBl6fh2jrv9NMFm/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/xf4FMULsuPDqBrejaRyg/ (jp) **

Mai & Naoto
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9SIZ0pl7sG8U12CodyMi/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Mario A
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/fscdwlYh9JPtQX7xC2or/

Matsukage Hiroyuki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wafCKmEAh4FLlRp3gDZQ/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zM7XWvbDikKEAQ38yI1t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/tOECh2HAmISpqMWBjeVb/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/cAyjStvrMHK3uOk2eD9P/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Nkzn2v6rRlWAZLImcqHT/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/fscdwlYh9JPtQX7xC2or/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VkK2Co3J9wrUH1iOBGZb/ **

Matsui Erina
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Uhi2SQH7GV54lJ1Craj6/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/cGkCTnFXjIb6aygxMAQq/ (jp) **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/DUyG5wZnN0EoiROLfr3k/ **

MIKAN
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TEWFw2HMUSun3tgGxzqf/

Minemura Ayumi (ARE YOU MEANING COMPANY)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0NukOMi9jWBVv8pXLKRe/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hbSUlD1z63g4BcATeZ5O/ **

Mitamura Midori
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Px7hXIFqLdCTWuMNmc6w/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/yNLX5pgtG2WHUu3IkRrw/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/fscdwlYh9JPtQX7xC2or/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Mitsuya Toshihiko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/ **

Miyake Mai
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SM8o0ajm7dVBCzXxRK6J/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Miyanaga Aiko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FyoVg0cWwfLMCqlP6I8i/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/

Mono-ha
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zMnqaA0XIdfS8NHW5v2x/ **

Morimura Yasumasa
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Vfji90F5ay3CNK8DhvQS/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/O3lracuhLK1WeDX2nSqR/ (jp)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pb5jrF6E3KZYc1USXvse/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/cTKmaj7Fh9lxqINEVipr/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/lfBmUGpzWZ6ADCTNOxQ0/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wgHbNkzEIOL8jDSJoqpu/

Murakami Takashi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/kVnhD073vbrsQJHu1pXI/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/V192WJ6wRYKzsUAvNjQ4/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/y0k4HsKjgC39ZAJ6SaGw/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4S8zjeabMwcoRXTrJdCD/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/HAledbG6CkXOfTyohMaB/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/dQ1krjb9vtT8lxZmoMw4/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZkefGnci1oY5CLTVUNAd/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/nUDm1uf2Vh3RNTKQrGqe/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9yIl4rkiFfN3Rh7PJEgd/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0RYXenHQrL3gEvqsId6p/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/YwA5JSx08a3XkZFpEbyr/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/

Murayama Macoto
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/1xpGujYH79PiNmv86TLJ/

Murayama Nobuhiko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Sr3tVFQAMz058kxsIZR1/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZFIXjS6wp9AcRyKY5meM/

Murayama Ruriko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ihgLvPUZQz8wnMpBdSxj/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/EADi80n47hM6flK9psUF/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/ **

Nakahara Kodai
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TjKIsrLvniZ5pCNbw9EY/

Nakamura Masato
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/LKRf38nAmPkvXp2EC1Wu/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/y0k4HsKjgC39ZAJ6SaGw/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/nUDm1uf2Vh3RNTKQrGqe/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/3jh7q90ZnwQiaBpX1rM8/ (jp) **

Nakazawa Hideki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/nUDm1uf2Vh3RNTKQrGqe/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/fscdwlYh9JPtQX7xC2or/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/rf1sUdiA60aVLWRvjcZM/ **

Nara Yoshitomo
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/REySKn3rX7FIZ6qgtzhc/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/vsklYKRmaJW2h3iEPtA9/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZlDXyNkuszmtW96SARcg/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/6NLsug0CfZprwAWyk2Y7/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0RYXenHQrL3gEvqsId6p/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9wL3d8W0aOtiDQqBlzxu/ (jp) **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VkK2Co3J9wrUH1iOBGZb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hlIApXvyYV9tP8Oi7Efu/

Nawa Kohei
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9YJT2DkpdZuqCVlHjeNA/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pGIqSw0D89Auta1bNPfQ/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wHeuEGJrmzKPTV2fRj1q/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/XVDEJCiUKgbMWLv4H06r/

New York artists
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZFIXjS6wp9AcRyKY5meM/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/DkMQ3fJmN2xsbeirIyLw/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Ninagawa Mika
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/CheStOvayBq2GIwzoMkQ/ **

Nishi Tatzu
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/W16gGvEICyfs3cFLPa7l/

Niwa Sijiro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SRLDEKjW4upbzwdvq8GC/

Odani Motohiko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/DUyG5wZnN0EoiROLfr3k/

Ohba Daisuke
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/XVDEJCiUKgbMWLv4H06r/ **

Ohno Satoshi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/

Ohtake Shinro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/NvT2gu5dwR10A4j6Xxkr/ **

Oiwa Oscar
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zM7XWvbDikKEAQ38yI1t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/tOECh2HAmISpqMWBjeVb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

O Jun
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/oApmQUe2JW6uVfziHh4C/

Okada Hiroko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/2hUn7BNpGikugJfd1SWe/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Okutsu Ayaka
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hbSUlD1z63g4BcATeZ5O/

Ono Yoko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/okPc2Wbryqzea3i9MTRU/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/tOECh2HAmISpqMWBjeVb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/680JfA4N9EzPwxTD7j3p/ **

Orimoto Tatsumi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Px7hXIFqLdCTWuMNmc6w/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/yNLX5pgtG2WHUu3IkRrw/ **

Ozawa Tsuyoshi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ihgLvPUZQz8wnMpBdSxj/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/y170WmDhCfzuZYpU9Sgj/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zM7XWvbDikKEAQ38yI1t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/cAyjStvrMHK3uOk2eD9P/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Nkzn2v6rRlWAZLImcqHT/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0NukOMi9jWBVv8pXLKRe/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/rgXubHONJ6nMofwFmj4B/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TEWFw2HMUSun3tgGxzqf/

Paris artists
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FyoVg0cWwfLMCqlP6I8i/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wgHbNkzEIOL8jDSJoqpu/

Sakamoto Keiko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9DLfkMYmbVp7ri3TUjev/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/OC4BxUguP1DZ5aQeTW0K/

SANAA
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/94Wnq2MskmGEbI08yiBK/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/7zSKAw6HEmoMJBQfrNaP/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Satom Saki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/jNHQroK0AqwIgf2uRD3t/

Sawa Hiraki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/o4eAXnK6bkidPD2Sj0R7/ **

Sekine Naoko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FyoVg0cWwfLMCqlP6I8i/

Shibuhouse
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pJc4MY9ETAbwmvsd5Unl/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/EmvNMksZWJI2DxbGRy4n/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VkK2Co3J9wrUH1iOBGZb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/G1vXMLQNib9pWTSetDfC/

Shiga Lieko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hlIApXvyYV9tP8Oi7Efu/ **

Shimabuku
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/jNHQroK0AqwIgf2uRD3t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/byOAZx47dwjhrzSLDfMX/**

Shimizu Jio
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Nu3KoCntsPd9ScBbFiDl/ **

Shinohara Ushio
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZFIXjS6wp9AcRyKY5meM/

Shiota Chiharu
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/rFwxs34jM9R20AnUiotT/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/REySKn3rX7FIZ6qgtzhc/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/7zSKAw6HEmoMJBQfrNaP/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/DUyG5wZnN0EoiROLfr3k/

Shirai Mio
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Px7hXIFqLdCTWuMNmc6w/

Showa 40 nen kai
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zM7XWvbDikKEAQ38yI1t/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/tOECh2HAmISpqMWBjeVb/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/cAyjStvrMHK3uOk2eD9P/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Nkzn2v6rRlWAZLImcqHT/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0NukOMi9jWBVv8pXLKRe/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Sone Yutaka
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/HAledbG6CkXOfTyohMaB/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4PY926tRdDnazb3ITMWs/ (jp)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TjKIsrLvniZ5pCNbw9EY/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/iTfCLGH4c3SmZgD5ARWP/ (jp) **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Suda Yoshihiro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/YWenxq6N12FKzigUCsuj/ **

Sugimoto Hiroshi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Suzuki Atsushi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wgHbNkzEIOL8jDSJoqpu/

Suzuki Hiraku
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SRLDEKjW4upbzwdvq8GC/ **

Tabaimo
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ihgLvPUZQz8wnMpBdSxj/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/WcIuftqk6Q920vHYr8ng/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Tabata Kouichi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/

Taguchi Yukihiro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Px7hXIFqLdCTWuMNmc6w/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/A7k5IwVfz8XsTRKxGrvJ/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wgHbNkzEIOL8jDSJoqpu/

Takamine Tadasu
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/O3lracuhLK1WeDX2nSqR/ (jp)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/KBipvdVRgYQwFJWea3xA/ **

Takeda Yousuke
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Takemura Kei
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/EADi80n47hM6flK9psUF/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/arYjPos5S6mpvB2zO10V/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Px7hXIFqLdCTWuMNmc6w/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/

Tanaka Atsuko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Q4ByYWjvbI08TlZrxNnh/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/lfBmUGpzWZ6ADCTNOxQ0/ **

Tanaka Koki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/W16gGvEICyfs3cFLPa7l/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TjKIsrLvniZ5pCNbw9EY/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Tanaka Iichiro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wgHbNkzEIOL8jDSJoqpu/

Tazuke Cousteau
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/1xpGujYH79PiNmv86TLJ/

Teruya Yuken
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/mMOiGEdv1SlNk0InaHUb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/O3lracuhLK1WeDX2nSqR/ (jp)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/lOWpnFZAVMXbDC2mNzte/ **

Tezuka Aiko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/

Toastie
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wgHbNkzEIOL8jDSJoqpu/

Tochka
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/

Ujino
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/O3lracuhLK1WeDX2nSqR/ (jp)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/ **

Watanabe Go
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/

Yagi Lyota
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Yamaguchi Akira
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/2hUn7BNpGikugJfd1SWe/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Yamamoto Motoi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/eKhoD8On3QaxvgkiX7sl/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/OvYDcnwuhrTQbza0dlHo/ **

Yanagi Miwa
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Vfji90F5ay3CNK8DhvQS/ **

Yanagi Yukinori
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/y0k4HsKjgC39ZAJ6SaGw/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/7zSKAw6HEmoMJBQfrNaP/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZFIXjS6wp9AcRyKY5meM/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0gnkJL2e6ujiKosCrFqv **

Yanai Shino
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/mBqdPN7oChMlZXxsLbuR/ **

Yasugi Akihiro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9DLfkMYmbVp7ri3TUjev/

Yoneda Tomoko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/o4eAXnK6bkidPD2Sj0R7/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/ **

Yoshida Yuki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9DLfkMYmbVp7ri3TUjev/

Young British Artists
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4T9lJCEYIxbpt6V0eKD1/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/AGuYBOno0K8hZbyvNimg/



Curators, Writers, Gallerists & Collectors


Aoyama Hideki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TjKIsrLvniZ5pCNbw9EY/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Asada Akira
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/oApmQUe2JW6uVfziHh4C/

Blum & Poe
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/baYH1nLyKtjmZJMzIuSv/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zMnqaA0XIdfS8NHW5v2x/

Borggreen Gunhild
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/AIUawimDPyCj9qTrpuEN/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0RYXenHQrL3gEvqsId6p/

Cavaliero Sophie
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SM8o0ajm7dVBCzXxRK6J/

Elliott David
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/6NLsug0CfZprwAWyk2Y7/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/cTKmaj7Fh9lxqINEVipr/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/o4eAXnK6bkidPD2Sj0R7/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/jl62vmFhBMs7DV4gkGJN/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pJc4MY9ETAbwmvsd5Unl/

Endo Mizuki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/y170WmDhCfzuZYpU9Sgj/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TjKIsrLvniZ5pCNbw9EY/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/iTfCLGH4c3SmZgD5ARWP/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hbSUlD1z63g4BcATeZ5O/

Favell Adrian (Before and After Superflat / Extracts)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/seBSJbcG5OxFazTvil0N/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/fscdwlYh9JPtQX7xC2or/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ShWJiZNeQzYalmpyOC2v/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9wL3d8W0aOtiDQqBlzxu/

Favell Adrian (Tokyo to LA Story / Essay)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0RYXenHQrL3gEvqsId6p/

Fukutake Soichiro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/7zSKAw6HEmoMJBQfrNaP/

Fujiki Rika (Mujinto Productions)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Fujitaka Kosuke
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pmBQgWh3nxt81rMcIkAe/

Furukata Taro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0gnkJL2e6ujiKosCrFqv/

Hasegawa Hitomi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9SIZ0pl7sG8U12CodyMi/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zM7XWvbDikKEAQ38yI1t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/tOECh2HAmISpqMWBjeVb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0NukOMi9jWBVv8pXLKRe/

Hasegawa Yuko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/eKhoD8On3QaxvgkiX7sl/

Hayashi Kiyohide
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZFIXjS6wp9AcRyKY5meM/

Hayashi Michio
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VkK2Co3J9wrUH1iOBGZb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/BFfHUsGqw17lIVKb4RdX/

Ikeuchi Tsutomu
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/YOfRuiLTvDgcQmnXHw1s/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/5j8AlLiv3QfbzBIKyTWk/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Imamura Yusaku
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ak4T9KEfLZ2zAPqhSgwv/

Ito Haruka
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Jack James
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/LKRf38nAmPkvXp2EC1Wu/

Jansen Gregor
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zM7XWvbDikKEAQ38yI1t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/cAyjStvrMHK3uOk2eD9P/

Kajiya Kenji
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/BFfHUsGqw17lIVKb4RdX/

Kamiya Yukie
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pb5jrF6E3KZYc1USXvse/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/BFfHUsGqw17lIVKb4RdX/

Kataoka Mami
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/REySKn3rX7FIZ6qgtzhc/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/A7k5IwVfz8XsTRKxGrvJ/

Kato Mizuho
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/lfBmUGpzWZ6ADCTNOxQ0/

Kawauchi Taka
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/baYH1nLyKtjmZJMzIuSv/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Kibukawa Ei (eitoeiko)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zVbAD0EvlKP6XjoknOJi/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9DLfkMYmbVp7ri3TUjev/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/OC4BxUguP1DZ5aQeTW0K/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0NukOMi9jWBVv8pXLKRe/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/mBqdPN7oChMlZXxsLbuR/

Kinoshita Chieko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/5j8AlLiv3QfbzBIKyTWk/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/O3lracuhLK1WeDX2nSqR/ (jp)

Kitagawa Fram
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/QXyh6VkHEgdvOMwJi9ce/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TRmvCasde71G36QALxfi/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/mMOpuoDiw8FjhvgcIVWf/ (jp) **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/7zSKAw6HEmoMJBQfrNaP/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TEWFw2HMUSun3tgGxzqf/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hlIApXvyYV9tP8Oi7Efu/

Kondo Hidenori
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Kondo Kenichi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/O3lracuhLK1WeDX2nSqR/ (jp)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/A7k5IwVfz8XsTRKxGrvJ/

Koyama Tomio
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/YOfRuiLTvDgcQmnXHw1s/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/CheStOvayBq2GIwzoMkQ/

Koyanagi Atsuko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/fo2M9dHR6NGB7S1uYvPw/

Kubota Kenji
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TRmvCasde71G36QALxfi/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SUK0P9lIveXo3Acr6iN8/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/O3lracuhLK1WeDX2nSqR/ (jp)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SM8o0ajm7dVBCzXxRK6J/

Kudo Kiki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/baYH1nLyKtjmZJMzIuSv/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/nUDm1uf2Vh3RNTKQrGqe/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pGIqSw0D89Auta1bNPfQ/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Kuroda Raiji
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/y170WmDhCfzuZYpU9Sgj/

Kurose Yohei
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Kusumi Kiyoshi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/rf1sUdiA60aVLWRvjcZM/

Marx W. David
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/yFY5cgw0PidVjtebM6XL/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ak4T9KEfLZ2zAPqhSgwv/

Matsui Midori
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/eWaA3torkdOCGgEpnK9s/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ar7wWh6qXv2z5xpeIEdB/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/jNHQroK0AqwIgf2uRD3t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/O3lracuhLK1WeDX2nSqR/ (jp)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TjKIsrLvniZ5pCNbw9EY/

McDonald Roger
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/y170WmDhCfzuZYpU9Sgj/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/O3lracuhLK1WeDX2nSqR/ (jp)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/o4eAXnK6bkidPD2Sj0R7/

Mitsuma Sueo
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/2hUn7BNpGikugJfd1SWe/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VkK2Co3J9wrUH1iOBGZb/

Miyake Shinichi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Mouri Yoshitaka
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0RYXenHQrL3gEvqsId6p/

Muir Gregor
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4T9lJCEYIxbpt6V0eKD1/

Nakamura Hiromi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Nanji Fumio
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/QXyh6VkHEgdvOMwJi9ce/

Nariai Hajime
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TjKIsrLvniZ5pCNbw9EY/

Nishihara Min
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/HAledbG6CkXOfTyohMaB/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4PY926tRdDnazb3ITMWs/ (jp) **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/iTfCLGH4c3SmZgD5ARWP/ (jp)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VkK2Co3J9wrUH1iOBGZb/

Nose Yoko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/TRmvCasde71G36QALxfi/

Ohayon Shai (The Container)
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pJc4MY9ETAbwmvsd5Unl/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/EmvNMksZWJI2DxbGRy4n/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/rf1sUdiA60aVLWRvjcZM/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/G1vXMLQNib9pWTSetDfC/

Ozaki Tetsuya
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/

Presneill Max
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/9DLfkMYmbVp7ri3TUjev/ **

Rawlings Ashley
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/gFYnVvsdpUTy7BbZeAW9/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hlIApXvyYV9tP8Oi7Efu/

Ritter Gabriel
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/2hUn7BNpGikugJfd1SWe/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/W16gGvEICyfs3cFLPa7l/

Sasao Chigusa
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hn3RmoblfFsPIiza6d4X/

Satani Shugo
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pb5jrF6E3KZYc1USXvse/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/4NIY6BvoUxlciCJhLRP5/

Sawaragi Noi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/YOfRuiLTvDgcQmnXHw1s/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/dQ1krjb9vtT8lxZmoMw4/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/7zSKAw6HEmoMJBQfrNaP/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/mBqdPN7oChMlZXxsLbuR/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/rf1sUdiA60aVLWRvjcZM/

Schimmel Paul
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/HAledbG6CkXOfTyohMaB/

Shimizu Minoru
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pGIqSw0D89Auta1bNPfQ/ (jp) **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/

Shiner Eric
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wgHbNkzEIOL8jDSJoqpu/

Snow Jean
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/yFY5cgw0PidVjtebM6XL/

Sumitomo Fumihiko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/c2xmzZyj98Aoe034WlRb/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/jNHQroK0AqwIgf2uRD3t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/G39B6ZmNuwPqvSL0jcfT/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/BFfHUsGqw17lIVKb4RdX/

Takahashi Mizuki
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/SUK0P9lIveXo3Acr6iN8/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zM7XWvbDikKEAQ38yI1t/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/KBipvdVRgYQwFJWea3xA/

Takahashi Ryutaro
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ihgLvPUZQz8wnMpBdSxj/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hM5OPpsLUrWje0vGDwo4/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/2hUn7BNpGikugJfd1SWe/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/cGkCTnFXjIb6aygxMAQq/ (jp)

Takahashi Yohsuke
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/mBqdPN7oChMlZXxsLbuR/

Tatehata Akira
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/

Tezuka Miwako
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/DkMQ3fJmN2xsbeirIyLw/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/YWenxq6N12FKzigUCsuj/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZlDXyNkuszmtW96SARcg/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Q4ByYWjvbI08TlZrxNnh/ **

Thornton Sarah
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/RFt5B2SmndygHbGXz3hp/ **

Tiampo Ming
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/DkMQ3fJmN2xsbeirIyLw/

Tomii Reiko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/REySKn3rX7FIZ6qgtzhc/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/DkMQ3fJmN2xsbeirIyLw/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Q4ByYWjvbI08TlZrxNnh/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/0RYXenHQrL3gEvqsId6p/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/5yZkRp3FIQ218ah0GW4d/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/ZFIXjS6wp9AcRyKY5meM/

Trofimchenko Rodion
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/1xpGujYH79PiNmv86TLJ/

Tsuzuki Kyoichi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/YwA5JSx08a3XkZFpEbyr/

Tsutsumi Seiji
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Uematsu Yuka
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/WcIuftqk6Q920vHYr8ng/

Walker Johnnie
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/zVbAD0EvlKP6XjoknOJi/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pJc4MY9ETAbwmvsd5Unl/

Watkins Jonathan
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/lfBmUGpzWZ6ADCTNOxQ0/

Worrall Julian
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/wMRJAFLf9ieQqGl7TDBU/ **
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/eFAGdyimJQCuNMkBzvxK/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Yabumae Tomoko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/pGIqSw0D89Auta1bNPfQ/

Yamaguchi Yumi
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/FScQrfq1BoyTngMHz3JV/

Yamamoto Yuko
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/YOfRuiLTvDgcQmnXHw1s/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/Uhi2SQH7GV54lJ1Craj6/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/cGkCTnFXjIb6aygxMAQq/ (jp)

Yamamoto-Masson Nine
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/VJ5e0xLFrqiQNZthfpB8/

Yamano Shingo
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/G39B6ZmNuwPqvSL0jcfT/
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hlIApXvyYV9tP8Oi7Efu/

Yoshimoto Midori
http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/DkMQ3fJmN2xsbeirIyLw/
2013/07/14 23:24
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Yoko Ono in Denmark


Yoko Ono, Voice Piece for a Soprano (1961)

A round of applause for the quite superb retrospective of Yoko Ono currently gracing Louisiana near Copenhagen, Denmark. The show, of course, is hardly needed as further proof of her power and importance, but nevertheless it adds new weight to her name, especially the excellent catalogue. The exhibition, curated by Ingrid Pfeiffer, originated in Frankfurt, and will head next year to Krems and Bilbao.



I was happy as I've not had the chance to see a big show like this before. All the classics were there, breathtaking in their purity and simplicity, certainly some of the greatest conceptual art ever made: Instruction Paintings (1961-2), Painting to Hammer a Nail (1961), Vocal Piece for a Soprano (1961, "Scream... against the Sky", etc), Cut Piece (1964), Grapefruit (1964), Mend Piece (1966), Sky TV (1966), Ceiling Painting/Yes Painting (1966 -- the one where John Lennon met her), Air Dispensers (1971). Classics all. Air Dispensers were recreated, and it was amusing how nobody apart from me seemed to take the instruction to "get involved" seriously. I was delighted to leave with my two kroner plastic "air capsule by Yoko Ono" as a souvenir and piece to own.

The emphasis was on older works. There was a sense of stasis after the incredible dynamism of the 1960s. Her work was always much better when she avoided objects entirely. Still, Vertical Memory (1997) impresses, as an atypical piece of confession about distant, imperious or abusive men in her life (mostly doctors). It is rather like a work by Sophie Calle. Also powerful is We Are All Water (2006): 100 bottles of water of famous people on a shelf, which is a curiously ethno-centric sampling of names -- very Western, very white, and very New York-centric, a quite basic choice mostly of famous artists and cultural icons, like an undergrad liberal arts college course about civilisation or culture. I could only find two Japanese names in the list: Hideki Tojo (Japanese prime minister during World War Two) and Tatsumi Hijikata (avant garde founder of Butoh).



Outside in Louisiana's lovely gardens, a Peace Tree (1996) received all our dearest wishes (my message: いっしよに).



The show also offered a generous sampling of Ono's artistic collaborations with John Lennon, particularly video works. It is clear that she was the teacher and he was the pupil.



Yet the big auditorium room full of Ono's rock music records and videos only really underlined how absolutely lousy she was as a pop musician. Recruiting their son, Sean, for recent tours hasn't seemed to help much either. At the same time, her influence certainly inspired some of Lennon's greatest moments.



Not, admittedly, Unfinished Music No. 1 -- Two Virgins (1968), which I listened to for the first and probably last time at this exhibition. I guess you had to be there. But a year later they were making the transcendental John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band LP, a truly mindblowing recording that contains music more raw and honest than almost anything ever made before or since. My favourite here was a clip off Top of the Pops, about 1970, with Lennon and Ono in freshly cropped radical chic haircuts and fatigued denim, John pounding out an incredibly funky and visceral "Instant Karma", and a blindfolded Yoko holding up cardboard signs for "smile", "peace", "hope", "breathe" etc -- with her microphone apparently turned off.

http://www.eyeneer.com/video/rock/john-lennon/instant-karma-0

Anyway, hats off for Yoko Ono -- and after so many years of struggle and pain, all smiles now as the crowds and the adulation simply roll in.

Yoko Ono, "Half-a-Wind Show: A Retrospective", Louisiana, Copenhagen, 1 June - 15 September 2013.

ADRIAN FAVELL
http://www.adrianfavell.com
2013/06/19 19:11
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Hiraku Suzuki



Hiraku Suzuki and Takehito Koganazawa's "Panta Rhei" (Everything Flows) at Talion Gallery in Nippori, Tokyo was one of my highlights of 2012, so I was happy to hop on Eurostar this week to catch Suzuki's talk about his work at Daiwa Foundation in London. Although hugely nervous about his public appearance, Suzuki delivered a fascinating talk about his "alternative archeology" and the show "Excavated Reverberations" that has been running at Daiwa from 21 March to 10 May 2013 .

http://www.dajf.org.uk/exhibition/excavated-reverberations-by-hiraku-suzuki

Hiraku Suzuki (b.1978) is a hugely popular cult figure in Japan with a background in experimental music and street art performance. As a recognised contemporary artist -- one of a group of mid to late 70s born "after the gold rush" artists that I have written much about -- he has developed very fast in recent years, extending his visibility to several prestigious international residencies and shows. At Daiwa he put the accent in his talk on its roots in a fascination with archeology dating back to his childhood. Citing Indiana Jones, he recounted how he used to visit the vacant sites of Jomon excavations in Kanagawa, where he grew up, to dig up his own fragments -- of ancient pottery, perhaps, but also old foreign coins, bits of plastic, old rubbish. The process captured his imagination, as one underlining that the real world also contains other hidden layers, unknown things, dormant under the surface.



In a sense, this process has become his dominant modus operandi throughout his career, a process mostly applied to the act of drawing. Suzuki talked animatedly about his attempts to "expand the field" of drawing, with ordinary paper an excavation site for remembered signs and images drawn out of everyday observations and experiences. His central work thus became his hugely successful GENGA series, which appeared as a book published by Kawade Shobo in 2011. The title refers to a word play between the words "gengo" (language) and "ginga" (galaxy), with "genga" also meaning primal or original pictures. In this work, Suzuki draws his own lexicon of signs and hieroglyphs -- which take anything from two months to two seconds to execute -- which echo as much his own phenomenology of place (cities, landscapes, travels) as (pre-)historical archetypes and trans-cultural psychological subconscious. Hence drawing becomes a kind of "alternative archeology".

Suzuki illustrated this particularly effectively (I thought) via explaining how, for example, he used fragments of asphalt to create new sculptures in natural forms such as ammonites (reminding us that right up close, in microscopic detail, the glass and concrete artifice of the city is also composed of ancient natural minerals and crystals); or how he might take a small element from an everyday piece of signage in the street (a Japanese road "stop" sign), then re-cycle it as a new element of his lexicon. In other installations, he has taken familiar signs and re-projected them on gallery walls, so they take on almost mystic significance. In the book GENGA he chose about 1000 of these images as entire self contained language of line drawing. Behind him at the talk, these signs appeared as a constantly shifting set of animated drawings in a video made from the GENGA work. Also on display, were the spectacular "ammonite" spirals of silver hieroglyphics seen at Talion -- obvious commercial works that illustrate the power of Suzuki's formidable technical control with lettering.

As the new work at Daiwa shows, there has been a marked shift in Suzuki's work, under the influence of a recent residency at Chelsea art college. Suzuki has tried to dig deeper in his process by tracing natural patterns of light, as well as the shapes of antique objects, re-projected now in silver paint as (photographic) "negatives" or "reverberations" of these lines and shapes. It is primal art that evokes the first "negatives" of hands painted onto walls in Paleolithic caves. The process also evolved from his first experimentations with sand cast sculpture, producing aluminium plinths on which his ever-morphing "glyphs" appear. There is a purity and simplicity to this work -- and a clear personal evolution -- but it will be interesting to see if he keeps his audience as he moves further away from the street and performance art associations that made him such a hit at the 2010 Roppongi Crossing.

The event at Daiwa ended early, so I was also able to trundle across town on London's creaking underground, in time to catch the opening at the Japanese art focused ICN gallery in Shoreditch.



From 2-25 May 2013, it is showing Nagoya based conceptual artist Seijiro Niwa (b. 1967) who, in a series of striking installation and photographic works, explores the phenomenological conumdrum of how consciousness (i.e., vision) is both "in" and "outside" the world -- producing objects not seen by anyone ("Ankyo") and objects visualisable only by a blind artist ("Mesashi").

http://www.icn-global.com/gallery/exhibition/2013/seijiro_niwa.html

I chat with the artist and a friend about his education in Aichi with the legendary Professor Hitsuda (who taught Yoshitomo Nara, Hiroshi Sugito and many others). Niwa will make a public talk about his work at ICN on Saturday 4 May 2013 at 2pm.

ADRIAN FAVELL
http://www.adrianfavell.com
2013/05/03 20:17
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Snack Hatoba



One lonely Berlin hotel room. One weary artworld nomad, who has seen everything. 9pm, Sunday night. A knock at the door.


WELCOME TO SNACK HATOBA

It's Ohitori Snack Hatoba!! Two mamas, Ayumi and Ayaka, a mobile dinner and drinks, the smallest dining bar in the world, an intimate evening à trois recreating the atmosphere and conversation of a small back street refuge, and a three way one-time-only art "performance" that has left me wondering why all art cannot be this beautiful, slow, sincere, involving ... and utopian.

http://www.facebook.com/SnackHatoba

Snack Hatoba is an art project/series founded by Are You Meaning Company -- Ayumi Minemura, a social/relational artist -- and performance artist, Ayaka Okutsu, in Berlin in 2011. Both have been involved extra-curricular in restaurant and catering jobs while making their way on the ever-freewheeling Berlin Japanese art scene. They had the idea of combining their interest in social staging and self-aware performance by creating Snack Hatoba, an occasional dining bar, in which they recreate -- nostalgically and imaginatively (since, they say, neither of them has ever been in one) -- the atmosphere of an authentic, old style Japanese dining bar, presided over by two tolerant, discrete, and sympathetic "mamas".

I have written before about Ayaka Okutsu's sometimes wrenching and physical performance work before, in a round up of the Japanese Berlin scene. Okutsu is a UK educated artist who has been in Berlin about five years.

http://www.art-it.asia/u/rhqiun/hCHn9Xu6LofPQ7EAiJaN/

Ayumi Minemura, meanwhile, has been in Berlin a little longer, and is a graduate of Zokei University from its golden years in the late 1990s, a period of experimentation that produced among others Koki Tanaka. With Are You Meaning Company, her perfomance unit, she continues to pursue a gentle relational art practice, often creating events and locations that bring people together and provoke reflections on space, identity and communication -- whether between couples or between strangers. Recently she has moved more to video work, leaving behind the object-based works with which she started out.

For most of its existence, Snack Hatoba has been a public event, a bar set up at parties and openings. It has been a big success in the Berlin art scene, and progressively they have honed their stage and performances with clever decor, costumes and persona, and a genuine warmth of atmosophere that has welcomed allcomers to their calm "port" in a stormy world. Too successful, perhaps; they say, that it was becoming too much like a regular bar, where they just served people. The point, of course, is talk; up close and personal, something not so easy in parties, although it would be fun to get guests to act out different roles and personalities at the bar.


AYUMI MAMA AND AYAKA MAMA

So, from this year, Snack Hatoba also exists in a new, miniature, personalised version: Ohitori Snack Hatoba. The bar is portable, with the table, lights, decor, food and drinks packed into two rucksacks. The mamas will come to your room, and set up the bar for an evening.


MIZUKI ENDO, GANGSTA STYLE

Their first guest was curator, writer and rice farmer, Mizuki Endo, who dressed in the specially provided costume, looked suitably gangsta-style. The talk explores various domains of personal psychology and history, with a personally tailored menu of choices to guide the subjects. I was the second guest. I had helped with a jazz soundtrack, and was able to offer a dimly lit, anonymous (and lonely) blue hotel room as the perfect backdrop. We squeezed the bar into the corridor near the bathroom, got into our costumes. Food was served, and drinks poured. I made my first choice -- "the Jungle of Life" -- and the talk began ...


PERFORMANCE ...OR THERAPY?

... Three hours later, I was waving goodbye, bowing and thanking the mamas as they left to slip out of the hotel. They had just smiled at the receptionist when they came up, and they left equally un-noticed. The experience is personalised ... and personal. We found ourselves drifting from role play to something more honest and intimate. In fact, as we discuss later, the concept is somewhat caught between self-conscious performance and quite open therapy. The talk was three way, we laughed a lot, and I was as much a part of the work as the two mamas behind the bar. Maybe we discovered a thing or two. But more strikingly, there was the sense of surreality happening there and then in the banal reality of a hotel room. A delicate, trusting and very gentle balance, however unlikely and unreal. I felt completely honoured to be there. A moment of beauty in an ugly, generic place. Very special. A utopian moment in everyday life.


TIME TO GO HOME

The next morning the receptionists were all smiling. One of them came over to me at breakfast and asked (auf Deutsch) if I would please come and answer some questions at the reception after. Uh-oh. But no, it was nothing; I just needed to clear a payment on the first couple of nights. When I got upstairs, the last of the food containers and beer bottles were gone. It was if nothing had happened (or, as Ayaka joked later, I had just had a sad night in with a take-away and a six pack). I began to wonder myself if I had just dreamt everything.



ADRIAN FAVELL
http://www.adrianfavell.com
2013/04/15 06:03
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J-Art after 1970




With all the Japanese art historical celebrations in New York surrounding the recent Tokyo 1955-1970: A New Avant Garde show at MoMA and the current Gutai show at the Guggenheim, it may now be time to start posing questions about the history of Japanese contemporary art after the watershed of the Osaka Expo of 1970. Meanwhile, the accompanying collection of primary documents for the MoMA show covers the period to 1989, also begging the the question: what about 1990 and after? Three of the editors - Michio Hayashi, Kenji Kajiya and Fumihiko Sumitomo - provide a short postscript of the period 1990-date, with some of the key elements; it is a skeleton for future reseach. My book from last year, Before and After Superflat: A Short History of Japanese Contemporary Art 1990-2011 also tries to provide the outline of a narrative that now should be explored in more detail.

All of which suggests the current Japan Foundation show in Seoul, Re: Quest - Japanese Contemporary Art since the 1970s may be an important moment in the definition of this new art historical agenda.

http://www.jpf.go.jp/e/culture/new/1302/02-02.html

It is one of the first Japanese retrospective shows to clearly pose its comprehensive selection from 1970 to the present day in art historical terms. All of the familiar names are included, but it is indeed interesting to read the concept statement by the head of the four-strong curatorial team, Tohru Matsumoto, who is the Deputy Director of the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art.

In it, he traces the roots of the 1990s and 2000s in the 1970s and 80s, periods which reflected both immense sea changes in global contemporary art and an insistence on the particularity of conditions in a Japanese context. I quote:

"The 1970s deeply reflected the modernist ideals of Universalism. Its vocabulary and methods were applied to explore psychological and social domains in the 1980s. The following decade saw young artists to begin adopting a completely new perspective: they started viewing Japanese culture as if they were foreigners. Then from the 2000s it came to a new generation of artists who sought to present the daily life of a highly diverse and complex society in films and installations. Looking back, we realize just how far we've come.

Despite all these developments, only a few art exhibitions that aim to trace and survey historically the art works of the 1970s and '80s have been organized -- in Japan, at any rate -- in the last few decades. This may be another sign of globalism. Meanwhile, interest in contemporary art of Japan and other Asian countries -- that is to say the modern, or contemporary, art that developed in parallel to Western art -- is in fact growing ever stronger worldwide, partly due to the international success of artists such as Kusama Yayoi, Lee Ufan, and so on.

Is there such thing as Japanese contemporary art history--history in the sense of a sequence of events and transitions? If so, to what extent, if at all, is this local history connected to the world art map or the radical changes that have shaped art history in the rest of world? These are questions that have guided the development of this exhibition aimed at taking a fresh look at Japanese contemporary art from a historical perspective."

I detect the strong influence in some of this of one of the other curators of the show: Yukie Kamiya, the chief curator at Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, whose international experiences and career in Europe, North America and Asia in the 1990s and 2000s has made her an authoritative interpreter of the contemporary scene in Japan. The shows she has overseen at Hiroshima since she took over in 2007 have provided a systematic base for the historical evaluation of the most recent decades in Japan (she also influenced my narrative greatly).

Perhaps not easy to recommend that every one head over to Seoul after New York, but let's hope that some of the same energies that have so spectacularly galvanised the post-war Japanese art historical scene in the US will carry over into later periods in this history.

More information on Before and After Superflat: A Short History of Japanese Contemporary Art 1990-2011: http://www.adrianfavell.com/BASF.htm

ADRIAN FAVELL
http://www.adrianfavell.com
2013/04/02 01:26
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J-Art after 1970

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